We want your online experience with Pepnet 2 to be the best. The browser you are currently using is not supported. Click on one of the supported browser button for a free download.
You may need to work with your IT to get a supported browser installed to replace your current browser that is becoming obsolute.
A validation e-mail has been sent to your e-mail address. In order to gain full access to the site, you will need to follow the instructions in that message.

Fast Fact: Assistive Listening Systems: An Introduction

The term assistive listening systems (ALS) describes a variety of technologies that reduce the barriers that result from distance and surrounding noise. 

Fast Fact: Assistive Listening Systems: An Introduction

Fast Fact: Assistive Listening Systems: Choosing the Right Technology for your Campus

Selecting the right assistive listening technology for a campus can be a daunting task.

Fast Fact: Assistive Listening Systems: Choosing the Right Technology for your Campus

Fast Facts: Effective Communication

Effective communication affords individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing the ability to share and/or receive information in a manner that is successful for them.

Fast Facts: Effective Communication

Fast Facts: Offline Captioning: Why Captions Provide Equal Access

Captions provide essential access for the more than 30 million Americans with a hearing loss.They also benefit emerging readers, visual learners, non-native speakers, and many others. Captions are the textual representation of audio content in a video format. They communicate spoken dialogue, sound effects, and speaker identification.

Fast Facts: Offline Captioning: Why Captions Provide Equal Access

Fast Facts: Offline Captioning: Creating Captioning

Captioning, a textual representation of the audio, is an important accessibility tool for people who are deaf or hard of hearing, as well as a benefit and learning tool for others. With so many avenues to obtain or create captioned media, ensuring that instructional materials are accessible is definitely achievable.

Fast Facts: Offline Captioning: Creating Captioning

Fast Facts: Telecommunications and Individuals Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: Devices and Software

Telecommunication technology has significantly changed the communication landscape for persons who are deaf or hard of hearing. For more than 40 years, text telephones (TTY) and amplified phones were their only options. Today, videophones, Smartphones, and instant messaging most often replace the TTY as preferred communication tools.

Fast Facts: Telecommunications - Devices and Software

Fast Facts: Telecommunications and Individuals Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: VRS, VRI and TRS Alphabet Soup

With technology seemingly always one step ahead of us, it’s easy to confuse the various telecommunication services used to visually connect hearing and deaf/hard of hearing individuals wishing to communicate with each other. There are three primary telecommunication services in use today: 1) video relay service (VRS); 2) TTY relay service (TRS); and 3) video relay interpreting (VRI). VRS and TRS are free programs regulated by the FCC, while VRI is a fee-based service that satisfies the communication-related mandates of the ADA.

Fast Facts: Telecommunications - VRS, VRI and TRS Alphabet Soup

Fast Facts: Notetaking

Notetaking is the practice of capturing important pieces of information in a systematic way. It is not limited to the classroom. Notetaking is an important accommodation in any situation requiring learning, including job sites and internships. Effective notetaking is a skill that is acquired through training and strengthened through practice. It is an accommodation that individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing rely on when they are in an environment of learning.

Fast Facts: Notetaking

Fast Facts: Sign Language Interpreters: In the Classroom

While visual language interpreters have gained more prominence and visibility in the classroom as a result of the passage of the American with Disabilities Act in 1990, they have been a part of the educational landscape since the early 1970s. Despite longevity in the classroom, the role and function of the interpreter is often confusing and distracting.

Fast Facts: Sign Language Interpreters: In the Classroom

Fast Facts: Sign Language Interpreters : Using Interpreters as a Reasonable Accommodation for Testing

Regardless of one's role in administering an assessment--as a professor in a college course or a psychological examiner conducting an evaluation-- test providers recognize the importance of obtaining an accurate measurement of student learning, knowledge, abilities, attitudes, and skills.

Fast Facts: Sign Language Interpreters : Using Interpreters as a Reasonable Accommodation for Testing