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Fast Facts: Universal Design

When curriculum is designed around UDL principles there is much less need for additional accommodations, since the materials are created with accessibility in mind.

Fast Facts: Universal Design

Fast Facts: Self-Advocacy - The Basics

Self-advocacy is a lifelong endeavor and can never be learned too early or too late in life. Practicing selfadvocacy is a critical element of the self-advocacy developmental process and individuals who do are better prepared to self-advocate in the future.

Fast Facts: Self-Advocacy - The Basics

Fast Facts: Transition for Individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Transition is the process all students go through as they move from a high school setting to what lies beyond. Transition programs assist students and their parents plan for life after high school in a proactive and coordinated way. An effective transition program provides students with the tools and the confidence to assume responsibility for their educational and employment decisions as they move into adulthood.

Fast Facts: Transition for Individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Test Equity: Video Discussions of the Fundamental Issues - Part 3

Test Equity for Individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: A Summit - August 2008, Broomfield, Colorado - Video Discussions of the Fundamental Issues

Video Discussions of Test Equity Issues

Test Equity: Video Discussions of the Fundamental Issues - Part 2

Test Equity for Individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: A Summit - August 2008, Broomfield, Colorado - Video Discussions of the Fundamental Issues

Video Discussions of Test Equity Issues

Test Equity: Video Discussions of the Fundamental Issues - Part 1

Test Equity for Individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: A Summit - August 2008, Broomfield, Colorado - Video Discussions of the Fundamental Issues

Video Discussions of Test Equity Issues

Online learning: benefits and barriers

Online learning: benefits and barriers

Online learning: benefits and barriers

Serving individuals who are DHH in rural communities

Serving individuals who are DHH in rural communities

 

Serving individuals who are DHH in rural communities

Assessing English literacy as a predictor of postschool outcomes in the lives of Deaf individuals.

By, Carrie Lou Garberoglio, Stephanie Cawthon, and Mark Bond.

National statistics show that deaf adults often do not experience success in adult life on the same level as in the general population in these three areas: life, employment, and education.  Many people, including researchers, believe that negative outcomes happen because deaf people have low English literacy skills. In order to assess whether deaf students’ English skills predicted their outcomes in adult life, the authors conducted a secondary analysis using data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2). Results show that the standardized measures of English literacy did predict some of the outcomes in this study, yet to differing degrees. Deaf individuals with higher literacy skills were more likely to live independently and had more positive self-beliefs, but the impact of English literacy on these outcomes was small. English skills did not play a role in employment or job satisfaction, but did predict higher hourly wages to a small extent. In educational settings, deaf individuals with higher English skills were more likely to enroll in college but not any more likely to complete their education. It appears that school-based English literacy skills are not necessarily a comprehensive predictor of successful adult life experiences for deaf individuals. It is also important to consider that standardized measures of English may not fully capture how deaf individuals navigate the world.

 

Assessing English literacy as a predictor of postschool outcomes in the lives of Deaf individuals.

Parental perspectives on transition and postsecondary outcomes for their children who are d/Deaf or hard-of-hearing.

By, Stephanie Cawthon, Jackie Caemmerer and the RES team

Parental involvement and parental expectations are important factors in successful academic and career outcomes for students who are deaf and hard of hearing. This article describes the results of a national needs assessment survey conducted by pepnet2 in the spring of 2012. Study participant were parents of SDHH or SDHH with additional disabilities (SDHH+) who were asked to provide their perceptions of the transition planning process. Participants were also asked to report on their expectations of postsecondary education and employment for their children who are DHH. The analysis resulted in several findings related to level of satisfaction with transition planning and parent expectations of transition outcomes for their DHH children.   Parents of SDHH+ and parents who identified at DHH themselves were more satisfied with the transition planning process than other parents. Parents were optimistic about their children’s future, with most parents expecting their child would complete a bachelors degree or higher.  This article has implications for transition planning practices and provides direction for research on issues related to transition. Specifically, future research efforts should focus on the relationship between parents’ experience with transition, and their expectations for future success for their DHH and DHH+ children.

Parental perspectives on transition and postsecondary outcomes for their children who are d/Deaf or hard-of-hearing.