We want your online experience with Pepnet 2 to be the best. The browser you are currently using is not supported. Click on one of the supported browser button for a free download.
You may need to work with your IT to get a supported browser installed to replace your current browser that is becoming obsolute.
A validation e-mail has been sent to your e-mail address. In order to gain full access to the site, you will need to follow the instructions in that message.

Assessing English literacy as a predictor of postschool outcomes in the lives of Deaf individuals.

By, Carrie Lou Garberoglio, Stephanie Cawthon, and Mark Bond.

National statistics show that deaf adults often do not experience success in adult life on the same level as in the general population in these three areas: life, employment, and education.  Many people, including researchers, believe that negative outcomes happen because deaf people have low English literacy skills. In order to assess whether deaf students’ English skills predicted their outcomes in adult life, the authors conducted a secondary analysis using data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2). Results show that the standardized measures of English literacy did predict some of the outcomes in this study, yet to differing degrees. Deaf individuals with higher literacy skills were more likely to live independently and had more positive self-beliefs, but the impact of English literacy on these outcomes was small. English skills did not play a role in employment or job satisfaction, but did predict higher hourly wages to a small extent. In educational settings, deaf individuals with higher English skills were more likely to enroll in college but not any more likely to complete their education. It appears that school-based English literacy skills are not necessarily a comprehensive predictor of successful adult life experiences for deaf individuals. It is also important to consider that standardized measures of English may not fully capture how deaf individuals navigate the world.

 

Assessing English literacy as a predictor of postschool outcomes in the lives of Deaf individuals.

Communication technology and deaf individuals' literacy skills

By, Carrie Lou Garberoglio, Duncan Dickson, Stephanie Cawthon, and Mark Bond.

A lack of direct access to language has been historically problematic for deaf individuals, contributing to gaps in English literacy achievement. The authors used data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2) to explore the hypothesis that increased access to English through computer-mediated communication (CMC) can increase direct access to language and literacy for individuals who are deaf. The results showed a relationship between the use of CMC and literacy, in that deaf adolescents who emailed or chatted more frequently showed higher reading comprehension skills in following years. Overall, the findings suggest that CMC may support English language and literacy development for deaf individuals. 

 

Communication technology and deaf individuals' literacy skills

PEPNet Tipsheet: Improving the Language and Learning of Students Who Are Deaf/El mejorar del lenguaje y la aprendizaje de los estudiantes que (Spanish version)

Use this tipsheet as a quick reference to learn strategies for teaching language, reading, and writing. (Published in Spanish)

PEPNet Tipsheet: Improving the Language and Learning of Students Who Are Deaf

Use this tipsheet as a quick reference to learn strategies for teaching language, reading, and writing to individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing.

Improving the Language and Learning of Students Who Are Deaf

Teaching for Success: Literacy, Diversity, and Technology -- Proceedings of the English Think Tank V

Articles address practical strategies to use when teaching English courses including: assessment, diversity, literacy, and technology.

Teaching for Success: Literacy, Diversity, and Technology -- Proceedings of the English Think Tank V

Developing English Skills and Knowledge Program

Sample writing workshops designed to help students become better prepared for postsecondary coursework.

Developing English Skills and Knowledge Program